Students as Partners Book Discussion: Promoting Equity and Justice Through Pedagogical Partnership (Session 3)
Friday April 22
Students as Partners Book Discussion: Promoting Equity and Justice Through Pedagogical Partnership (Session 3)
11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Zoom

During the Spring 2022 semester, the FIC will explore "students as partners" initiatives across a wide range of discussions and initiatives. As we prepare for the Spring 2022 Colloquium, we invite the university community to engage in discussion around the value of the "students as partners" approach from pedagogical and institutional vantage points.

To that end, we will read the open publication, "Promoting Equity and Justice through Pedagogical Partnership" (Alise de Bie, Elizabeth Marquis, Alison Cook-Sather, and Leslie Patricia Luqueño) and discuss its contents with one of the book's authors, Alison Cook-Sather, who will also serve as our keynote speaker for the upcoming colloquium. Dates for this discussion will be as follows: Session 1: Chapters 1-2 (April 8); Session 2: Chapters 3-4 (April 15); Session 3: Chapters 5-6 (April 22); Session 4: Chapter 7 and wrap up (April 29). all sessions on Zoom or hyflex from FIC, 11:00-12:30pm. 

Please join us! We welcome participation from faculty members and instructors, staff, and student representatives.

Please RSVP by February 17 to be included in the SAP Spring 2022 book club.

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Faculty and staff in higher education are looking for ways to address the deep inequity and systemic racism that pervade our colleges and universities. Pedagogical partnership can be a powerful tool to enhance equity, inclusion, and justice in our classrooms and curricula. These partnerships create opportunities for students from underrepresented and equity-seeking groups to collaborate with faculty and staff to revise and reinvent pedagogies, assessments, and course designs, positioning equity and justice as core educational aims. When students have a seat at the table, previously unheard voices are amplified, and diversity and difference introduce essential perspectives that are too often overlooked.

In particular, the book contributes to the literature on pedagogical partnership and equity in education by integrating theory, synthesizing research, and providing concrete examples of the ways partnership can contribute to more equitable educational systems. At the same time, the authors acknowledge that partnership can only realize its full potential to redress harms and promote equity and justice when thoughtfully enacted. This book is a resource that will inspire and challenge a wide variety of higher education faculty and staff and contribute to advancing both practice and research on the potential of student-faculty pedagogical partnerships.